Send in the humans: content curation for beginners

With so much content proliferating on the web and in social media platforms, it can be hard to find good quality information. Search engines like Google can help, but they find content based on algorithms and the search results are influenced by website search engine optimisation (SEO) tactics – not necessarily a good reflection of the quality of the content.

So what’s the answer? Humans! More and more, people are looking for curated content on their topics of interest. Where better to look for good quality content on a topic than subject matter experts or people with a passion for that topic?

What is content curation?
It’s a fairly straightforward concept. I can hear the librarians out there sighing and thinking ‘I’ve been doing that for decades!’ True, if you are looking for someone particularly skilled in this sort of work, look no further than the library.

Content curators sift through a bunch of content on a particular topic, find the good stuff, collate it, give it some context and share it online either on their own websites/ blogs or via curation tools such as Pinterest, Scoopit or Storify.

Why do it?
There are a few good reasons why you/ your organisation might want to curate content.

It’s a cheap and easy way to increase your expertise in a subject matter. I wanted to learn more about content curation, so I started scanning the web on the subject matter. I found and read what I thought were the best articles/ blog posts on content curation and have collated them here (see below). I’ve added context to them by writing this blog post and now I’m sharing them with you. As a result, I’ve increased my knowledge about content curation and have a great set of references on the topic.

You can use curated content to increase your network by finding others who share your interests and connecting with them. It’s an excellent way to build an online community garnered around a shared passion, subject or cause.

It’s a great way to demonstrate expertise, or to use a buzz phrase ‘thought leadership’ on a topic. By curating content on a particular topic you are showing that you have thought about and understand the topic. Ideally, this will lead to others seeking you out for your expertise on the subject and help increase your influence.

Content curation is a great basis for content marketing. By curating content, you are populating your website/ blog and creating a product that you can reticulate as part of your social media strategy. Link to it in Twitter, post it to Facebook, share it in LinkedIn and Google+.

How do I start?
Content curation can be like getting sucked into an online vortex. You could easily disappear for days, forget to eat, and be discovered wandering the corridors in a dazed stupor, so you need to have a plan before you start.

1.    Decide on a goal for curating content – why are you doing it?
2.    Set a schedule – curate regularly, even if it’s just 1 hour a week
3.    Choose your topic – make sure it is linked to your goal/ brand
4.    Choose your sources – don’t wander aimlessly online
5.    Scan, evaluate & select the best content
6.    Read the best content in depth
7.    Think about the content and decide why it is important to your curation
8.    Annotate/ comment on/ evaluate the content to give it context for your audience
9.    Share it and engage your audience – ask for comments, contributions

Is there content curation etiquette?
Of course. Always credit your sources, just like old-fashioned referencing. Plagiarism isn’t any more acceptable online than in a university thesis. On that note, I should mention Beth Kanter here as a major source for this blog post.

Just like any other social media activity, join in the conversation. If you want others to engage with your content, you need to engage with theirs too. This is easy – comment on other people’s content curation efforts, link to them and thank them when they contribute or comment on yours.

What types of content should I curate?
You can curate any sort of content on your topic. The best approach is to mix it up and curate a variety of media such as video, text, photos, blogs, infographics, presentations etc.

Want to know more?
I’ve listed my picks of the best sources for content curation below. Read some of these for inspiration and give it a go.

Please share this post or contribute by adding your comments.

Sources

5 Tips for Great Content Curation

Gaining Authority in the Age of Digital Overload

4 Promising Curation Tools That Help Make Sense of the Web

Why Content Curation Is Here to Stay

5 Ways to Use Content Curation for Marketing and Tools to Do It

Content Curation Primer

8 Ways to Find Great Social Media Content

Are Content Curators the power behind social media influence?

The Curation-Over-Creation Trend That Fueled Pinterest’s Rapid Growth

Content curation – what is it?

The Unanticipated Benefit of Content Curation

30+ Cool Content Curation Tools for Personal & Professional Use

September Net2 Think Tank Round-up: Curating Content

2 thoughts on “Send in the humans: content curation for beginners

  1. Pingback: Beginner’s guide to developing a social media content strategy « hub & spoke: justine hyde

  2. Pingback: Creating serendipity in the digital world « hub & spoke: justine hyde

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