Transforming yourself for the future library: VALA 2014 bootcamp

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Bootcampers hard at work

What does the library of the future look like? How can librarians prepare themselves for leading the library of the future? These are the questions I asked a group of around 30 attendees at the bootcamp ‘Transforming yourself for the future library’, which I ran at the VALA 2014 conference in Melbourne. My slides for the presentation are below.

Joe Janes’ book Library 2020 was an excellent jumping off point for thinking about how libraries might look and work in the near future. I asked the bootcampers to imagine their library in 2020 by completing the sentence “My library in 2020 will be…”. You can see the diversity and imagination of their responses below. My personal favourite is the first one, so I’ve included the original post-it note. I’m hoping to discover the author.

Who is the mystery author of this post-it?

Who is the mystery author of this post-it?

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@infoseer checks out the “My library in 2020 will be…” responses

After imagining their library in 2020, I put out the challenge to the bootcampers to think about their own skills and knowledge. The bootcampers identified a fear to overcome and a passion to embrace that would help them prepare for leading the library of the future. They then came up with ideas for creating transformational learning experiences to face their fears and pursue their passions.

It is confronting to speak with your peers about your fears. I was heartened by the honesty and openness of the bootcampers and their willingness to talk about their work related anxieties. The fears people named centered around themes such as: interpersonal communication and networking, public speaking and presentations/training, leadership and decision-making, reference skills, writing, time management and juggling priorities, and managing data, paperwork and finances. Perhaps these are the areas that library leaders, educators and professional associations could focus on for professional development opportunities for library staff.

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The passions people were not surprising given it was a group of librarians. The themes were: empowering, educating and connecting others, information/digital literacy, research, writing and publishing, sharing knowledge, collaboration, design, heritage, and technology. The bootcampers are clearly in the right profession to match their passions.

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Running the bootcamp was great fun. I felt privileged to lead a group of passionate and engaged librarians through thinking about the future of libraries and their own professional development. I hope the bootcampers went away from the session with some practical ideas they can use when they get back to work.

Did you attend the bootcamp? What did you take away from the session?

The peer-reviewed paper that I wrote to accompany the bootcamp is available on the VALA 2014 website for conference delegates and VALA members. It will also be be available to the public in May, or you can contact me for a copy. The hashtag for the session was #vala14 #bcc.

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Seattle: conference wrap

‘Libraries make everything better,’ according to Joe Janes (@joejanes) the editor of the book Library 2020. Janes delivered the closing session of the AALL 2013 conference. In Janes’ book, he asked a number of contributors to write essays starting with the line ‘The Library in 2020 will be…’. Janes’ presentation summarised the divergent views expressed in these essays, organised around the themes of stuff, place, people, community, leadership and vision. Some of these views are optimistic, while others paint a bleaker picture of the future for libraries.

Janes’ view is that the library of 2020 will be characterised by the things librarians uniquely bring such as service orientation, organisation, literacy, quality, depth, authority and detail. He believes that successful libraries will serve niches and that their focus will move away from giving access and acting as middlemen, since middlemen are increasingly redundant. Just look at travel agents and record store owners as examples.

Janes’ session was a perfect way to close the conference. He was very entertaining and his ideas were provocative. Janes concluded by asking the audience to reflect on their own libraries and where they want them to be in 2020.

Another session I enjoyed over the last few days was a presentation on integrating iPads into an academic library at Duke Law. The presenters focused on reference services, classroom teaching and library services. Their papers are online.

Steve Hughes (@stevehughes) ran a session on giving great presentations where he focused on opening your session powerfully, tips for good presentations, making your session interactive, and being confident through body language and eye contact with the audience. Hughes was a engaging and funny presenter, and made the session interesting, practical and fun. The tips I found most useful were ideas for having an intriguing introduction to your presentation, and making the most of people’s natural curiosity to get them engaged, energised and interacting with you during presentations.

A panel discussion on ebooks raised more questions than resolutions. What I found most interesting was that American libraries are struggling with ebook lending, licensing and formats just as much as Australian libraries. Libraries and publishers alike have a long way to go to resolve a workable model for ebooks. I think ebooks will go the way of CD-Roms and be replaced by more sophisticated digital formats.

But conferences aren’t all about sessions, there’s also the social side of things…

Last night was the ‘Member Appreciation Event’, a big conference party. The event was hosted at the incredible Experience Music Project, a music museum. Food, drinks, music and the museum’s exhibitions made for a great party. My favourite exhibitions were the Nirvana and Women Who Rock ones.

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After the party, we discovered the fabled publisher hospitality suites in the conference hotel. A tip for anyone attending this conference in the future, find the hospitality suites. The big legal publishers rent out suites and provide fully stocked bars for delegates every night of the conference, open into the wee hours of the morning. No wonder they charge so much for subscriptions.

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The conference is over now and I am a little sad. My new found American library friends are headed back to their home towns across the country and now I’m solo in Seattle. But my library business is not over yet. Next up, a tour of the Seattle public library, and a meeting with one of the directors there. Stay tuned.