Listicles, muesli bars & mansplaining

What do best books listicles, the discovery of a 25-year-old muesli bar and a Swedish hotline for mansplaining have in common? They are the topics I discussed on Radio National Drive’s ‘My Feed’ segment.

I also talked about librarians on social media, book discussions on Twitter and how I use Goodreads to inform my reading.

You can listen to the podcast of the show here.

If you would like to explore some 2016 best books listicles, here are some good ones to start with:

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ANZ 23 mobile things

ANZ 23 mobile things logo

ANZ 23 mobile things logo

Social media is a powerful platform for connecting. It creates opportunities to reach outside of organisational hierarchies. It busts open geographic boundaries. Social media allows us to eavesdrop on conferences and conversations. We can share experiences with people outside our immediate network. We can listen, participate and learn. A great example of connecting and learning through social media is 23 Mobile Things, a self-directed online course focussed on learning about ‘mobile technologies that are changing the way people, society and libraries access information and communicate with each other’.

ALIA NGAC (Australian Library and Information Association New Generation Advisory Committee) and New Professionals Network NZ have teamed up to create ANZ 23 mobile things a cohort of around 500 librarians in Australia and New Zealand doing the course together. As well as participants, people have signed up as mentors and volunteers to help create and deliver the course. The course is supported by a Twitter account @anz23mthings and Facebook page ANZ 23 Mobile Things as well as a blog. The course has just started and runs from May-November 2013.

The real beauty of the concept is that it is teaching about social media by using social media. It is an immersive learning experience. The course is creating connections between participants and generating a real buzz on Twitter with the hashtag #anz23mthings. I’ve reflected before on the power of connecting via social media. This is another wonderful illustration.

You have to hand it to librarians. They know how to network.

The power of connecting via 140 characters

Image Who hasn’t used Twitter to kill time on public transport, procrastinate when there’s something more important to do, or exchange witty lines with friends. Twitter entertains, it informs and it connects. Today I was jolted, not by the latest #auspol outrage or Kochie gaffe, but by the real power of Twitter. By humanity.

I’ve been following the @HomelessInMelb account for a couple of weeks. It’s a curation rotation account, which means tweets are rotated between different guest tweeters. The most recent guest tweeter, @_JoeBrown_ has tweeted his experiences of homelessness. Sleeping in cars, trying to find accomodation, dealing with the red-tape of government agencies, and enduring the cycle of joblessness and poverty that no Australian deserves. Joe is an ex Victorian firefighter who was injured and subsequently lost his job.

He and his male partner, @BS_evens have had particular difficulty accessing temporary accommodation services because of being a gay couple. They appear to fall between the gaps of ‘need’ because they do not have drug and alcohol problems.

Today, Joe & Ben got a house in Reservoir. They tweeted the experience of trying to secure the house. They were short of money for the bond, for food, for removalists and for household items. Twitter responded. The short-fall in rent was raised, and @Mrs_KT is coordinating donations and assistance to help make their house a home.

That’s the power of Twitter. Humanity. Connection. A happy ending to a hard story.